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Oatmeal Bread

Oatmeal Bread

I love this oatmeal bread and make it fairly frequently.  It is a quick recipe as far as yeast breads go and very easy.  It makes great toast and wonderful sandwich bread with its soft crumb and slightly chewy texture from the oatmeal.

It has a fabulous flavor and tastes great toasted or used as sandwich bread. Try serving it with a dip like our herbed olive oil or garlic butter sauce.

Sometimes I enjoy taking the time to mix and kneed my bread by hand but today I had several tasks on my schedule so I threw the ingredients in my bread machine, punched in the “dough” setting, and walked away.  Once the setting was complete I shaped the dough and placed it in a standard bread pan. 

I don’t care for the shape of the bread loaf that my bread machine has so I never finish my bread in the machine, however, this recipe would work just fine if you prefer to bake it in the machine.

Oatmeal Bread

Adapted from James Beard

Oatmeal Bread

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Oatmeal Bread

Oatmeal Bread

Yield: 16 slices (1 loaf)
Prep Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 15 minutes

A perfect everyday sandwich bread with a light crumb and chewy texture from the oatmeal.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup rolled oats (not instant)
  • ½ cup boiling water
  • 2 ¾ cup all purpose flour
  • 2 ¼ teaspoons instant dry yeast
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • ¾ cup warm milk (see notes)
  • 3 tablespoons honey

Topping

  • 1 tablespoon rolled oats

Instructions

  1. Place the oats in a small bowl and pour the boiling water over them. Allow them to sit for 5 minutes to soften the oats and cool down until lukewarm.
  2. Place the flour, yeast, and salt in a large mixing bowl and stir them together. Add the softened oats, warm milk, and honey then mix well until all the ingredients are combined (the dough will be sticky and lumpy). Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow it to rest for 15 to 20 minutes.
  3. Either with an electric mixer, or by hand, knead the dough for 8-10 minutes until it is smooth and elastic (dough will be slightly sticky).
  4. Form the dough into a ball and place it in a large bowl that has been coated in oil. Coat the top of the dough ball and cover it with plastic wrap then set it in a draft free place until it is doubled in size, about 1 to 1 ½ hours.
  5. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and gently pat it into a rectangle then shape it into a loaf. Oil an 8 X 4 inch bread pan and place the dough in the pan. Moisten the top of the dough with some water then sprinkle 1 tablespoon of oats over the dough. Cover the pan with a cloth and allow it to sit in a draft free place until the dough is about ½ inch above the top of the bread pan (about 45 minutes to 1 hour).
  6. Pre-heat the oven to 350°. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes or until the loaf sounds hollow when tapped on top.
  7. Remove the bread from the pan and allow it to cool on a wire rack.

Notes

  • Warm the milk to between 105°F to 110°F. If you don't have a thermometer then make it just slightly warmer than body temperature (check it by putting a drop on your wrist or the back of your hand).
  • If you prefer to use a bread machine, place the ingredients in the machine in the order recommended by the manufacturer and let the machine do its magic. This recipe works very well with a bread machine.
Nutrition Information:
Yield: 16 Serving Size: 1 slice
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 106Total Fat: 1gCarbohydrates: 22gProtein: 3g

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Elizabeth Ramsey

Tuesday 17th of November 2020

I had a problem with my dough rising on the second proof. I did the autolyse for one hour. Also substituted 3/4 cup of bread flour for the AP. When I put the batter in my stand mixer with the dough hook. Within a couple of minutes it came together. I did find that seemed extremely fast. The first proofing was fine. The second one in my bread pan did not rise about the pan. Can you tell me what I did wrong?

Elizabeth Ramsey

Monday 23rd of November 2020

@Dahn Boquist, Thanks for your response. I did use instant yeast as said in the recipe. The first proofing was fine. It was the second proof that was the problem. I placed the dough in the bread pan inside my oven (oven off) covered with a cloth. I let it rise a lot longer than the time given for because it wasn't rising above the pan as directed. It didn't even rise to the top of the pan. Our temperatures are still warm here in Georgia so it wasn't cold in my kitchen. I did bake it and it turned out okay but was a little dense. I've never had this problem before.

Dahn Boquist

Tuesday 17th of November 2020

It's hard to know without more information but perhaps you needed to let the dough rise for longer or the temperature was a bit too cold. Are you using instant yeast?

Rachel Wells

Friday 25th of October 2019

I was wondering if you heat the milk to a certain temp. Thanks for the recipe.

Daria

Saturday 19th of December 2020

@Dahn Boquist, I don't check temp. I place the liquid in the microwave to heat. After I pull it, I stick my finger in it. If my finger burns, it's too hot for the yeast and allow to cool a bit. I proof even the instant yeast - you never know if it is a bad batch, plus I enjoy watching the yeast come to life.

Dahn Boquist

Friday 25th of October 2019

The best temperature for proofing yeast is between 105°F and 110°F. To be honest, I don't check the temp with a thermometer although I did when I first started baking bread. Now I just "guestimate" the temperature by how it feels on my wrist... kinda like I used to check the temperature of baby bottles when my son was little haha. Yeast isn't really as fussy to work with as it sounds. If you go outside that range of temperatures then it will still proof (just not as quickly). The most important thing to know is that if the liquid is too hot then it will kill the yeast. But you have a pretty big safety zone because yeast doesn't die off until it reaches temperatures over 125°to 130°F. Thanks for your question Rachel, I will update the recipe card. Hope you enjoy this bread, it sure makes incredible sandwiches and toast.

grayslady

Friday 22nd of March 2019

Thank you so much for publishing this recipe--especially for the modifications from James Beard's recipe. I was looking for an inexpensive (no butter or oil, no eggs) oatmeal bread recipe and this is it. Since I never keep milk in the house, I simply substitute powdered milk (4 1/2 tbsp powdered milk to 3/4 cup water) and it works perfectly. I also use 3/4 cup bread flour and 2 cups all-purpose flour, just because I like the texture that bread flour provides. The honey makes the bread too sweet for my taste so I use 3 tbsp light brown sugar instead. As you mentioned, the batter can be quite sticky, and it took several attempts to get the right consistency using my stand mixer (I don't have a bread machine). My two tips: 1) autolyse the batter for an hour rather than 20 minutes, adding the salt right before kneading, and 2) weigh the flour using 125 grams as the weight for 1 cup of flour. The dough will still be slightly sticky, but still manageable, and the taste of the finished bread is just how oatmeal bread should taste.

Lani Day

Monday 11th of May 2020

This recipe is awesome! The best bread I’ve made. I don’t have a loaf pan so I doubled the recipe (minus the yeast) and baked two loaves side by side in an 8x8 cake pan. (Hilariously lopsided loaves, but tall and even slices.) The recipe doubles extremely well, and since we ate half a loaf already, I’ll always be making two loaves of this stuff!!

Dahn Boquist

Friday 22nd of March 2019

Thanks for your comment, I'm so glad this recipe worked for you :)

Dezerie

Sunday 10th of September 2017

How many slices is the nutrition based on?

Dahn

Sunday 10th of September 2017

Hey Dezerie, the nutrition is based on 16 slices to the loaf, thanks for asking, I updated the nutrition.

Jerry Hancock

Friday 21st of March 2014

em... nice looking bread. I will definitely have to try this recipe someday... especially since the supermarkets in Memphis don't seem to stock very much bread variety except for white bread. (I don't hardly ever buy white bread.) No matter which Kroger store I go to - or other supermarket - it seems to be a regional issue. I'm not sure yet. However the shelves will have eight or ten feet of white bread, and 18 inches of whole wheat bread mixed in with other varieties as well, and no matter how much I try to find the freshest loaf, it always turns out to be a few days old when I open it up and try it. BTW - when I stocked the grocery store shelves at Safeway many years ago, I learned that the bread that is the oldest will have one color of twisty ties - or plastic closures - stocked in the front of the shelf, and the freshest loaves will have a different color behind them, and sometimes to the back. Now for years I have always looked for the freshest bread in the back of the shelf that has a different color of tag, but here in Memphis it doesn't seem to matter: The six or seven times that I've bought whole wheat bread here in Memphis has always been disappointing on the freshness, so I just don't buy bread here anymore. One of these days I'll have to get after this recipe you have here for oatmeal honey bread! Sounds great, and looks great too!

Dahn

Friday 21st of March 2014

I hope you do try it Jerry it really is a good bread recipe and there is nothing better than the smell of fresh bread baking in kitchen. Let me know if you try this. :)

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